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IT Influencers Series Summary in Forbes

The Most Influential IT Thought-Leaders

by Peter High, series on Forbes.com

I would like to introduce a new series, which I refer to as “IT Influencers.” The field of Information Technology is home to many innovators and thought-leaders. These individuals, all from vastly differing walks of life, share a commonality: Their expertise and unique insights have made them some of the most influential members in their professions and in IT. This is a diverse lot, including individuals like:

In the kick-off article to the series, I highlight some common denominators among these trailblazers:

  1. All of them have thought about business value first, and technology second
  2. Most have worked in other business disciplines prior to ascending to the CIO role
  3. Many work within organizations that promote from within
  4. A majority have an MBA or advanced degree in a business discipline
  5. Many also have spent time as consultants

Below are the IT Influencers Series’ most recent posts:

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Stewart Butterfield, CEO of Slack

Slack is the fastest growing workplace software ever. The company’s CEO Stewart Butterfield co-founded the company in August of 2013, as a cloud-based team collaboration tool.

As fast as the organization has grown, interestingly enough, Butterfield underestimated the true opportunity for the idea that he and his co-founders developed. Originally, when he first pitched Slack, he believed the market for this software was $100 million, which they recently exceeded in revenue in roughly three years.

As the organization has grown at such an impressive clip, Butterfield has been forced to grow the team substantially in parallel. He has done so with a laser focus on certain cultural attributes, aligning recruiting practices to his established mission in order to ensure the continued addition of high quality employees. As Butterfield notes below, the mission is: “to make people’s working lives simpler, more pleasant, and more productive.”

Click here to read the full article.

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Craig Newmark, Founder of Craigslist

Craig Newmark did not set out to be among the most influential people in Silicon Valley when he moved to San Francisco in 1993. After spending 17 years at IBM, he moved west to take a job at Charles Schwab. It was roughly around that time that he began to grasp the power of the Internet to connect people. In 1995, he started Craigslist as a distribution list to friends to share information about social events.

At first, Newmark was surprised when people on his distribution list began sharing information about topics other than events. It grew quickly, and Newmark’s beginning as an entrepreneur was under way. By 1997, the site he developed was large enough to attract potential sponsors like Microsoft. Not long after that, venture capitalists and bankers reached out suggesting significant investments in the site. Newmark spurned these advances that could have increased his net worth significantly, but in the process he did not have any masters to answer to, and he was able to keep the cost of running Craigslist low, and the cost to users low by extension.

Today, Newmark is less involved in the day-to-day operations of Craigslist, and instead focuses most of his attention on Craigconnects.org. Newmark pursued this after it dawned on him that he had gotten involved in hundreds of causes, but he did not feel that he was able to make a truly meaningful contribution without focus. Craigconnects supports causes he is passionate about like veterans and military families, women in technology, voting rights, peer-to-peer funding, and worthwhile journalism.

In this interview, Newmark covers his business ethos, people who have influenced him, the ways in which he remains abreast of technology trends, the books he reads, as well as a daily work regimen.

Click here to read the full article.

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Mike Schroepfer, CTO of Facebook

Earlier this year at Facebook’s F8 conference, the company revealed three innovation pillars that make up the company’s ten-year vision: connectivity, artificial intelligence (AI), and virtual reality (VR). Facebook’s Chief Technology Officer Mike Schroepfer is responsible for leading each of them. Despite the fact that the vision is ten-years in duration, the company has made significant progress in each.

Facebook’s progress in AI can been seen in everything from the company’s news feed to the way in which people are tagged. The virtual reality innovations are best demonstrated through the Oculus Rift, which I demo’d last Thursday. More recently, the company made a great flight forward on the connectivity pillar as Acquila, a long-endurance plane that will fly above commercial aircraft and the weather, took flight in Arizona. The goal is for this v-shaped aircraft that has a wingspan longer than a Boeing 737, but weighs under 1,o00 pounds to bring basic internet access to the developing world.

I met with Schroepfer at Facebook’s headquarters in Menlo Park, and we discussed these three pillars and a variety of other topics, including the company’s recruiting methods, how the company maintains its innovative edge, and the logic behind its headquarters – one of the largest open-space offices in the world.

Click here to read the full article

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John Hagel, Author of The Power of Pull, Net Gain, and Net Worth

John Hagel III is a prolific author and an adviser to CEOs around the world. His most profound impact has been at the intersection of business strategy and technology, predicting a number of significant and transformative trends in books such as The Power of Pull, Net Gain, and Net Worth. In 2007, Hagel co-founded the Deloitte Center for the Edge Innovation along with John Seely Brown and Lang Davison.

From his base in Silicon Valley, Hagel has observed great companies with great cultures, and he believes a shift (a “Big Shift” to be more precise) is afoot in business. Those who embrace scalable learning within the enterprise and across the ecosystem of the company’s partners will be positioned best for sustainable success.

Hagel also notes that leaders need to ignite the “passion of the explorer” in one’s work force in order to keep the best people stimulated to generate innovative ideas. Furthermore, he notes that one to five year planning horizons may wane in importance, replaced by what he refers to as “zoom out and zoom in” strategic planning. He covers all of the above and more in this interview.

Click here to read the full article

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Steve Case, Co-founder of AOL

Steve Case was one of the architects of the first wave of the Internet. For many who learned about him and his company in the mid-1990s, it may have seemed as though his was an overnight success, but AOL took nearly a decade to truly take off. The early days required building a great team, working on the product, and building strong platforms. It also required perseverance, a familiarity with and an ability to influence government policy, and an ability to establish strong partnerships.

In Case’s new book, The Third Wave: An Entrepreneur’s Vision of the Future, he talks about the how the work of entrepreneurs today will have to heed the lessons of the entrepreneurs of the first wave of the Internet (roughly from 1985 to 1999) more than those of the the second wave (roughly 2000 to 2015). He also talks about how venture capital will flow to cities that have not traditionally been tech-sector hubs, as the “rise of the rest” phenomenon. Some of his insights come from his having witnessed the rise of Washington, DC from an entrepreneurial back-water when he founded AOL in that area to a dynamic technology hub today.

His book is an interesting read; part memoir, part history lesson, and part crystal ball. In it, he offers sage advice from one who has experienced the highest of highs in founding a company that was, as he points out, “for most Americans…for its time, Google, Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, Spotify, YouTube, and Instagram combined.” He also covers candidly the low points after the acquisition of Time Warner in 2000. In the years since, he has focused on venture capital and philanthropy, and he has developed a healthy perspective on how the lessons of the past will impact the future.

Click here to read the full article

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Scott McNealy, Co-Founder and former CEO of Sun Microsystems

When one thinks about the companies that laid the foundation of the commercial internet, one thinks of companies like Cisco, AOL, IBM, and Sun Microsystems, among others.  Sun was co-founded by Scott McNealy, who did not have a technical background, and yet ran one of the most successful tech-centric companies of ‘80s and ‘90s. The company created Java , Solaris Unix, and the Network File System to name three of many products designed by the company. Oracle purchased Sun Microsystems in 2010 for $7.4 billion, and since then, McNealy has invested in and advised a number of technology companies from his home-base in Silicon Valley.

In 2010, he co-founded Wayin, a social intelligence company that integrates social content into new experiences for consumers and delivers greater value and control for brands. The company recently merged with EngageSciences, a British social media firm that McNealy suggests will give Wayin a dominant position in his space.

Click here to read the full article

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Ron Ross, Fellow at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

Ron Ross is a Fellow at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, or NIST, a non-regulatory agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce. NIST’s mission is to promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life.

Ross’ role at NIST is in the information technology laboratory, where he leads the Federal Information Security Management Act Implementation Project. He is also the principal architect of the NIST Risk Management Framework, and leads the joint taskforce between the Department of Defense, the Intelligence Community, and the Committee on National Security Systems that developed the Unified Information Security Framework for the federal government. To my mind, he has one of the clearest and most comprehensive approaches to data security, a topic we drill down into great depth in this article. Last week at a Forbes CIO dinner in Washington, DC that I co-hosted with Forbes Managing Editor, multiple government and private sector CIOs noted how influential Ross has been on their approaches to cybersecurity. For that reason, I’m particularly excited to share some of his biggest ideas.

Click here to read the full article

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Meg Whitman, CEO of Hewlett Packard

Meg Whitman has led HP as CEO since September of 2011. In October of last year, she and her fellow board members announced their intent to split the PC and printers business from its enterprise products and services business. The former would be known as HP Inc., and the latter would be known as Hewlett Packard Enterprise. This would amount to the largest technology firm break-up of all time, creating two companies with revenues in excess of $55 billion.

The date of the split (November 1) is fast approaching, and I was curious about her thoughts about how things had progressed between the time of the announcement and now. Our interview was one of the first after the company’s most recent earnings release. Though she acknowledged that the news was mixed, she indicated that enormous progress has been made in breaking up the two companies, and that she is as confident as ever that the breakup is the right move.

We also spoke at length about her career path, her thoughts about increasing the number of women in executive positions at technology firms, what she learned from her time running for governor of California, and a variety of other topics.

Click here to read the full article

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Marc Lore, CEO and Founder of Jet

Within the next week, Jet.com will officially launch. It promises to offer the lowest prices on the Internet. As Marc Lore notes in this interview, the key is to provide pricing that more accurately reflects purchase bundles and the distance that the goods need to travel.  Lore spent the early part of his career as an investment banker, and has brought a depth of knowledge about financial models and algorithms to several experiences as an entrepreneur. Chief among those was Quidsi, the parent company of e-commerce websites Diapers.com, Soap.com, and Wag.com, among others. Lore co-founded the company in 2005 and sold to Amazon in 2011 for $550 million. Now Lore and Jet have Amazon squarely in its sites, hoping to under-cut the 800 pound gorilla of retail, and beat it in the marketplace space.

Click here to read the full article.

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Peretz Lavie, President of the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology

Stanford and MIT receive well deserved recognition as hotbeds of entrepreneurship, but neither of those is as singularly influential in the US as the Israel Insitute of Technology, better known as the Technion. Sincet the university’s founding over one hundred years ago, a quarter of the university’s graduates have started businesses.  Since 2004, graduates of the Technion have won four Nobel Prizes, and a remarkable two-thirds of Israeli companies listed on NASDAQ have been founded by graduates of the Technion. Israel is often referred to as “start-up nation”, and the Technion has contributed more than any other institution to that reputation.

Since 2008, Peretz Lavie has served as President of the Technion. During that time, he has hired faculty who are experts across traditional academic silos, encouraged more professors and students to get involved in starting businesses, and in the process has bolstered the university’s reputation as a hot-house for new businesses.

Click here to read the full article.

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Dion Weisler, Executive Vice President of HP’s Printing and Personal Systems Organization

Dion Weisler is the Executive Vice President of HP’s Printing and Personal Systems organization, a $57 billion annual revenue business that includes personal computers, mobility devices, technical workstations, printers, graphics solutions, managed-print services, and internet services. He has been named the future CEO of HP Inc. when that company separates from Hewlett Packard Enterprise later this year. His rise at HP has been meteoric, and his prior success at both Acer and Lenovo, including stints in dozens of countries across the globe mean that he has a healthy knowledge of the competitive landscape and appreciation for the need to balance serving mature markets and developing markets differently.

I met with Weisler at HP Discover, the company’s customer event in Las Vegas earlier this month. We met in a make-shift office his leadership team kept in the Venetian Las Vegas. He was surrounded by members of his leadership team as we spoke, but the casual yet insightful conversation offered great insight into where things stand in the separation, his own thoughts about where he sees opportunities for the future, and I got a glimpse into how excited he is about the future of HP Inc., and the need to emphasize innovation (including pursuing moon-shot-type projects), and the need to find talent across the globe.

Click here to read the full article.

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Emerson Spartz, CEO of Spartz Media

Emerson Spartz started his first company at the age of 12, when he founded MuggleNet, which became the number one Harry Potter fan site.  In his early teens, he managed a team that grew into the hundreds.  He wrote best selling books, hosted the most listened to podcast, and dreamed of additional businesses to develop. To make his schedule more flexible, he suggested to his parents that he be home-schooled.

At a time, when many influential technologists (Peter Thiel most prominent among them) eschew the value of university education for those with an entrepreneurial bent, Spartz attended the business school at Notre Dame as an undergraduate, and used the time to strengthen his ability to learn while seeking the next new idea to pursue.

Soon after graduation, he founded Spartz Media, the organization he still runs now. His area of expertise is virality, a topic that he and his team have distilled into a science of sorts. He describes his methods herein. At 27, he has been an entrepreneur for 15 years, and speaks with the authority of a seasoned veteran.

Click here to read the full article.

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Vicente Fox, Former President of Mexico

Recently, I was thrilled to be invited to meet with former Mexican President Vicente Fox at his presidential library, the first for a Mexican president. Among the many opportunities he has pursued is to develop a Charlie Rose-style interview program. I was a guest on his show, and he agreed to return the favor.

Fox’s story is an extraordinary one. He rose from delivery route supervisor to President of Coca-Cola Mexico. He was elected as Governor of Guanajuato after first serving in the federal Chamber of Deputies. As he explained in my interview, he did not grow up dreaming of being President of Mexico. Rather, he got involved because he had grown so frustrated with corruption.  He won an improbable victory  on his 58th birthday, July 2, 2000. In this interview, we spoke about his major accomplishments as president, the importance of thinking strategically, the transformative power of technology, as well as a variety of other topics.

Click here to read the full article.

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Yves Béhar, Founder and Principal Designer of Fuseproject

Yves Béhar is an unusually busy executive, even by Silicon Valley standards.  He is the founder and principal designer of fuseproject, an award-winning industrial design and brand development firm. Béhar is also Chief Creative Officer of the wearable technology company Jawbone, and Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of August, creators of the first Smart Lock. He is perhaps the most decorated industrial designer of the past 15 years, and his clients (past and present) include Apple, Google, GE, Samsung, Herman Miller, and Prada. Since 2005, Béhar has also been the chief industrial designer of One Laptop per Child, and he is also the Creative Co-Founder of OUYA, an open sourced gaming platform. Additionally, he has long-term partnerships with various other companies.

When I met Béhar in his office in San Francisco, I wondered how he found the time to be involved in so many meaningful projects and enterprises. He indicated that it is a combination of having wonderful partners across all of his work streams coupled with a joyful feeling of always being open to inspiration that can fuel his creative process. He indicates that it is his life experiences, and being in the milieu of creative people wherever he goes that allows him to be involved in so many creative ventures without feeling either overburdened or tapped of good ideas.

Click here to read the full article.

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Sebastian Thrun, CEO and Co-Founder of Udacity

There are few entrepreneurs who can compete with Sebastian Thrun in terms of creativity and breadth of innovation. He led the development of Stanley, a robotic vehicle on the 2005 DARPA Grand Challenge. He was a founder of the Google X Lab, and parlayed his earlier success with Stanley into the Google driverless car system. He also was among the leaders who developed Google Glass. All the while he was a professor first at Carnegie Mellon and then at Stanford.

In early 2012, based on inspiration from Salman Khan of Khan Academy, he co-founded Udacity, a for-profit education company offering massive open online courses, or MOOCs. Thrun’s Stanford course “CS 373: Programming a Robotic Car” was among the first couple of courses offered through Udacity, and it attracted 160,000 students in 190 countries. The youngest was ten and the oldest was 70. Moreover, none of the top-400 students were Stanford students. He was so excited about what he learned, that he gave up his post at Stanford to focus on Udacity full-time.

Click here to read the full article.

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Rich Karlgaard, Publisher of Forbes

Rich Karlgaard is widely known as the publisher of this magazine. What may be lesser known is how diverse and entrepreneurial his career has been.  He started two magazines, Upside and ASAP within the Forbes banner. He has founded a venture capital firm, Garage Technology Ventures, and is an advisor to multiple other VCs. He also founded Silicon Valley’s premier business and technology forum, a 7,500-member strong organization called the Churchill Club. Is there a thread that runs through all of those things? As such, he has become one of the most influential figures in technology and business more generally.

Having had the pleasure to get to know Rich, one of his primary gifts is storytelling, and identifying what is interesting and special in others. This strength is in full-blossom in his new book, The Soft Edge: Where Great Companies Find Lasting Success. Rich has long had a curiosity to determine the factors that have led some companies to endure during good times and bad. Especially in this day-and-age when analytics rule, he focuses on “softer” factors, chief among them being culture. Though he lives and works in the heart of Silicon Valley, he left the bubble of that region to profile companies in places like Milwaukee, Wisconsin (Northwestern Mutual), Rochester, Minnesota (The Mayo Clinic), and Memphis, Tennessee (FedEx).  I spoke with him to find out more about what he learned that other companies should institute to develop a more lasting success.

Click here to read the full article.

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Dr. James Goodnight, CEO of SAS Institute

Jim Goodnight is one of the great technology entrepreneurs of the past fifty years. His emphasis on data analytics as a business model starting over 40 years ago with the development of Statistical Analysis System (SAS) while he was an academic at North Carolina State was quite prescient, presaging the analytics boom that has taken over so many industries by multiple decades. Over the years, SAS has been used by pharmaceuticals companies to help them analyze their drug pipelines better, by banks to help them assess who to give credit cards to, and to an increasing extent by a wide array of companies to assess fraudulent activity and risk management, which Goodnight suggests will be a significant area of growth for SAS.

Goodnight has built a multi-billion dollar software company without going public or seeking suitors to buy the company. He points to the advantage that he had in receiving early funding from government and academic sources rather than from venture capital, which meant there was no pressure to create a financial event for his investors. As a result, he has been able to successfully steer his company through many business cycles while avoiding significant layoffs that are de rigeur among so many major companies. This has been a cultural differentiator, and is one of the reasons that SAS is regularly chosen among the best places to work in the United States.

Click here to read the full article.

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Sir James Dyson, Inventor, Industrial Designer & Founder of Dyson Company

Sir James Dyson is a modern day Edison. In a world where products are typically released to the public as quickly as possible, Dyson and his team work through hundreds and sometimes even thousands of prototypes of a product before the public sees them. With an estimated net worth of $4.5 billion, Dyson has the wherewithal to operate in such a manner, but I was curious how he developed his methods, and how he influenced his teams before he was considered perhaps the UK’s greatest living innovator.

Despite his vast wealth and resources, that was not the measuring stick that he used in the early days of his career. Instead, he had an obsession to make elegant and easy-to-use products that people wanted to use on a daily basis. As he has explained it, if you look at the design of a ski, you will see the passion of the person who created it. They designed it to use themselves. The same care and passion has not traditionally been put into products like the vacuum cleaner, however. Who has a passion for vacuuming, especially when it is a loud messy process? Dyson was frustrated by these factors when he created a better vacuum cleaner. In the process, Dyson has influenced others who have chosen to innovate in categories of products that had long been thought of as difficult to improve upon. He has also unintentionally spawned a number of imitators along the way.  Through it all, Dyson has remained singular in his focus on perfection, realizing that business success would follow. In the process his influence has been felt much further than he might have thought early in his career.

Click here to read the full article.

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David Pogue, Yahoo! Technology Columnist & CBS News Correspondent

David Pogue has become a household name in tech criticism from his “State of the Art” column in New York Times along with multi-media contributions to PBS and CBS among others. Last week, Pogue launched Yahoo Tech at CES in Las Vegas to much fanfare. The new digital magazine is quite sophisticated in its fit and finish, and it remains as such no matter the device with which it is accessed. Its innovative article tiles allow readers to read articles while all other articles remain on the same page. As Pogue explains below, this should make the site stickier and more psychologically satisfying.

When I last spoke with Pogue in mid-2013, he was firmly planted at theNew York Times and referred to his post as “the greatest job in the world.” I wondered what had changed in the ensuing six months and what else he had planned for Yahoo Tech.

Click here to read the full article.

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Salman Khan, Executive Director & Founder of Khan Academy

I have had the a good fortune of speaking with good number of the leaders in education technology today. Since so many of these players have emerged from academe, the competition between companies is fierce certainly, but there is also a collegial willingness to acknowledge the successes of other companies. In the case of non-profits like edX, CEO Anant Agarawal says, the more companies that enter this space, the merrier. (Stay tuned for my interview with Agarwal on January 20th.) Several of these leaders acknowledge that the most influential person to the MOOC landscape has been Salman Khan.  As Agarwal lists the genesis of the MOOCs, he lists Khan and his Khan Academy first among the major players. Sebastian Thrun acknowledged in my interview with him that “I stumbled into this after listening to a gentleman named Sal Khan of Khan Academy. In his speech he noted that he had tens of millions of students in his classes. I was teaching at Stanford at the time and had tens of dozens of students in my classes, and I felt I should try something different and see if we could do what I do and scale it to many people.” In fact, in my podcast interview with Thrun, as he listed those who had been most influential to him over the course of his career, he listed Khan on the short list.

Click here to read the full article.

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Walt Mossberg, Journalist/Columnist

Walt Mossberg has been called the most influential technology critic in the world. As I prepared for our interview, I was interested in the similarities between Mossberg and the famous wine critic, Robert Parker. Each is a powerful commentator whose opinions can make or break product launches, whose field of criticism is dominated in this country by activities in Northern California. Yet each chooses to live in Maryland, each refuses to accept gifts or perform advisory roles to those companies whose products he critiques, and each relishes the role of criticism even if greater remuneration would follow from joining such companies. Mossberg made quite clear that the mantle of “most influential technology critic” was not one that he chose.

Click here to read the full article.

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